The Great Reads Award 2017 📚📚📚📚📚

This is the second year of The Great Reads Award, a debut YA award shortlisted by SLARI (School Library Association of Ireland) and voted on by teen readers! This summer I’m delighted to one of those school librarians who gets to read wonderful YA books with other librarians to decide on which books will make the shortlist! 🤓✌📚❤
The shortlist will be ready in late August, just in time for all of our eager readers teens to get going on their reading once we are back to school! Our Lady’s is going to be very much involved in the awards so we will get as many readers on board as possible! 👐

Here’s the current longlist, which will be whittled down to eight from 20 by the end of August. I foresee some very hard decisions as they all look so interesting! 😍

Follow the awards for updates on Twitter @greatreadsaward

Facebook The Great Reads Award

I have a lovely little pile to read over the next few weeks, and I’m very tempted to add a few more! 🤓😂

As always you can follow the library on Twitter for more updates @ourladyslibrary 🐻

Senior Book Club – Summer Edition! 📚📖🌅🏖✌

Summer Senior Book Club Picks!

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Two very different books here, as per usual we have on YA (Young Adult) book an one adult book! Happy Summer Reading! 

Release by Patrick Ness

Inspired by Mrs Dalloway and Judy Blume’s Forever, Release is one day in the life of Adam Thorn, 17. It’s a big day. Things go wrong. It’s intense, and all the while, weirdness approaches…

Adam Thorn is having what will turn out to be the most unsettling, difficult day of his life, with relationships fracturing, a harrowing incident at work, and a showdown between this gay teen and his preacher father that changes everything. It’s a day of confrontation, running, love, heartbreak, and maybe, just maybe, hope. He won’t come out of it unchanged. And all the while, lurking at the edges of the story, something extraordinary and unsettling is on a collision course.

Suitable for 15+ 

See the post about getting to meet Patrick Ness and having him sign the library’s copy of this book here –>  An Evening With Patrick Ness! 😍✌🤓📖

The Raqqa Diaries by Samer

‘A clarion call to all of us that we should not give up. Somewhere there is a voice in the wreckage.’ Michael Palin

‘This is brutal non-fiction, plainly and urgently told.’ Robin Yassin-Kassab, Guardian

‘The simple act of bearing witness is one of the most powerful human responses available . . . The Raqqa Diaries is so important.’ Evening Standard

‘Everyone should spend a couple of hours of their life reading it, to remind themselves that, even in the darkest depth of human misery, the bravest souls still exist.’ Sunday Times

Since ISIS occupied Raqqa in eastern Syria, it has become one of the most isolated and fear-ridden cities on earth.

The sale of televisions has been banned, wearing trousers the wrong length is a punishable offence, and using a mobile phone is considered an unforgivable crime.

No journalists are allowed in and the penalty for speaking to the western media is death by beheading.

Despite this, after several months of nervy and often interrupted conversations, the BBC was able to make contact with a small activist group, Al-Sharqiya 24. Finally, courageously, one of their members agreed to write a personal diary about his experiences.

Having seen friends and relatives butchered, his community’s life shattered and the local economy ruined by these hate-fuelled extremists, Samer is fighting back in the only way he can: by telling the world what is happening to his beloved city.

This is Samer’s story.

Suitable for 15+

Take a look at May Senior Book Club Picks

See OLS Library’s activity on Twitter @ourladyslibrary

Junior Book Club – Summer Edition!📚📖🌅🏖✌❤

Summer Junior Book Club Picks!

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Two very different books here, both are fantastic! Happy Summer Reading! 

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

“There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

From Maggie Stiefvater, the bestselling and acclaimed author of the Shiver trilogy and The Scorpio Races, comes a spellbinding new series where the inevitability of death and the nature of love lead us to a place we’ve never been before.

Suitable for 13+ 

Accelerated Reader Book Level 5.4

One by Sarah Crossan

Grace and Tippi. Tippi and Grace. Two sisters. Two hearts. Two dreams. Two lives. But one body.

Grace and Tippi are conjoined twins, joined at the waist, defying the odds of survival for sixteen years. They share everything, and they are everything to each other. They would never imagine being apart. For them, that would be the real tragedy.

But something is happening to them. Something they hoped would never happen. And Grace doesn’t want to admit it. Not even to Tippi.

How long can they hide from the truth—how long before they must face the most impossible choice of their lives?

Suitable for 12+

Accelerated Reader Book Level 5.2

Take a look at May Junior Book Club Books

Take a look at OLS Library on Twitter @ourladyslibrary

CBI Book of the Year Awards 2017 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

After months of reading the shortlisted books for the CBI Book of the Year Awards, talking about them, voting on them, and partaking in a video about them (!) the awards were held in Smock Alley Theatre on Tuesday 23rd May and we finally got to hear the winners!

First take a look at our fantastic Book Club Beanbag ladies discussing Historopedia, Plain Jane, The Call, The Ministry of SUITs, and Needlework along with other young shadowers in this wonderful video

*8 mins in to see the OLS girls

Aren’t they fantastic?! Thanks to Sarah Hyland L3, Marie Bishop B4, Jennifer Bishop B1, Catherine Galvin L1, Roisin O’ Neill C1, Anna Murray C1, Isabelle Roantree C1, Halle Donnelly Mahon B1, and Aisling Coyle C1 for participating!

Now for the awards…

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  • Honour Award for Fiction: needleworkDeirdre Sullivan for Needlework. The judges said, ‘Needlework by Deirdre Sullivan is a poetic and eloquent exploration of violation, abuse, neglect and advocacy of the transformative power of art. Starkly genuine and sincere, Sullivan’s powerful use of the metaphor of tattooing invites reflection about identity, difference, self-protection and self-invention. This searing yet delicate representation of adolescent experience will resonate deeply with teenagers and is a story that needs to be told and needs to be read.’ Little Island Books. Suitable for 15+

 

 

  • Judges’ Special Award: Tadhg Mac Dhonnagaín, Jennifer Farley, Brian Fitzpatrick, Tarsila Krüse and Christina O’Donovan for Bliain na nAmhrán. Futa Fata. Suitable for 3-7 year olds.

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  • Eilís Dillon award for a first children’s book: Paul Gamble for The Ministry of Strange, Unusual and Impossible Things. Little Island Books, Suitable for 9+the ministry

 

 

 

Children’s Choice Award:The Call  Peadar Ó Guilín for        The Call. This is the award that was chosen by the shadowing groups who read and judged the ten shortlisted titles and voted for their favourite!

*This was our favourite, and got our vote for Children’s Choice which we think is the most important award, shh…

David Fickling Books. suitable for 14+

 

 

And with such high praise from the man himself who can argue! twitter

 

 

And finally, the overall winner and recipient of the CBI Book of the Year Award 2017 is… 

Picturebook maker Chris Haughton with his book Goodnight Everyone0Chris was also the recipient of the Honour Award for Illustration for the same title. The award judges said ‘Chris Haughton’s vibrant illustrations combine perfectly with deceptively simple narrative in this mesmerising bedtime tale. Chronicling a series of animal yawns, the colour palette gradually darkens as the world of the forest is painted in sunset. Haughton’s use of cut-outs is particularly effective and the star maps in the endpapers add a mystic dimension to this captivating story.’

 

I don’t know about you but now I’m just excited to find out what books will be on the shortlist next year!

 

You can read the Children’s Books Ireland Press Release for more information on the awards.

Take a look at OLS Library on Twitter @ourladyslibrary

An Evening With Patrick Ness! 😍✌🤓📖

I went along to the Easons event in the Lighthouse Cinema last night to see Patrick Ness talk about his new book Release. An extra surprise was that he was interviewed by Deirdre Sullivan who is the author of Needlework, one of the CBI Awards shortlisted books!

I also got to meet him and he signed my book, but more importantly 😜 one for the school library too, with an extra special message! 😂   (pictures below)  He said to say hi to you all 👋

I’ve been a huge fan of Patrick Ness’ writing for a long time, if you haven’t read any of his books come and talk to me in the library! In fact he is my Author of the Month, which wasn’t a thing but now it is! 👐

 

*update! see our Twitter @ourladyslibraryfor info on another favourite author coming to Dublin soon! ✌😱

#SkipToTheNaughtyBits 😂😱✌

Release is available in the library now, unfortunately for seniors only 😅

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Go to GoodReads.com  to read blurbs and reviews!

 

 

 

 

Library News Roundup! 🤠

D.E.A.R. – Drop Everything And Readscreenshot_20170427-133859.png  On Friday Our Lady’s School was involved in the nationwide D.E.A.R.!  It was so much fun to be able to stop working and get our books out. A huge thank you to all of the participating teachers!  👍 We definitely want more of this kind of thing!

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  • Book Clubs – Our Junior Book Club meets every Wednesday at lunchtime in the library.  Starting from this month we also have an online version of our Book Club in both Junior and Senior formats.   The idea behind this is to allow anyone to read the Animated-gif-cat-reading-a-bookBook Club monthly picks in their own time, and then discuss them here in the comments!   The Senior version allows for both senior students, as well as teachers and parents, and anyone else who would like to join in on the reading fun!   In September, we hope to have a Senior Book Club monthly meeting in the library!   You can see the current monthly picks by clicking on the book clubs below 🙂   There is now a ‘Book Clubs’ tab on the websites main menu 🤓✌📖

 

 

  • Reading Reps MeetingAs well as consolidating all of the Parent Reading Habits survey information (see below), our Reading Reps decided on a new theme for the month.   So moving on from Mystery Month, we are now into Fantasy Month!  🦄🦄🦄🦄 Look out for fantasy posters around the school, and come check out a fantasy book from the library!  Take a look at the fantasy options on the library’s online catalogue heretumblr_static_tumblr_static_filename_640.gif
    •  Parent Reading Habits Survey results
      It turns out that parents of OLS students love to read :)~58% of those surveyed read on a daily basis. The other 42% varied between, every few days, once a week or less often.
      ~61% prefer to read in the evening, while 29% like to read at any opportunity!
      ~55% spend around 30 minutes reading at a time, while 30% read for an hour or more, and the rest 20 minutes or less.
      ~Fiction, biographies, and specifically crime fiction and mysteries are the most popular types of books with OLS parents!
      ~And finally, from the MANY listed favourite books, the most common ones were ‘The Book Thief’ by Markus Zuzak, ‘The Kite Runner’ by Khaled Hosseini, ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen, and ‘The Girl on the Train’ by Paula Hawkins.Well done to the parents for even deciding on favourites, we know how hard it is! Thank you so much for taking part in the survey, and a very well done to the Reading Reps for carrying out the survey and for tallying the results! 🤓📖✌

 

  • CBI Shadowing Scheme – BOTYA-2017-A3-PosterDelighted to report that the shadowing of the CBI Book Awards books is going brilliantly!  Everyone seems to be particularly enjoying ‘The Call’ by Peadar O’ Guilin.   As well as that we have some secret and exciting news regarding the Shadowing Scheme that we will soon be able to share with everyone! 😎

 

 

 

  • Monthly Book Review Competitiontenor This Friday is the deadline for April’s Book Review Competition (where did April go?!) To enter you just need to review any book and give it a star rating out of five. Then email your review to librarian@olschool.ie to be in with a chance of winning a €10 book token! Get writing! 💸💸💸

Take a look at the library on Twitter @ourladyslibrary

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Senior Book Club – May

May Senior Book Club Recommends…

 

 

The Power by Naomi Alderman

In The Power the world is a recognisable place: there’s a rich Nigerian kid who larks around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But something vital has changed, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power – they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.

This extraordinary novel by Naomi Alderman, a Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year and Granta Best of British writer, is not only a gripping story of how the world would change if power was in the hands of women but also exposes, with breath-taking daring, our contemporary world.

 

The Blood Miracles by Lisa McInerny

The second novel from the author of the Baileys Prize-winning The Glorious Heresies*

Like all twenty-year-olds, Ryan Cusack is trying to get his head around who he is.

This is not a good time for his boss to exploit his dual heritage by opening a new black market route from Italy to Ireland. It is certainly not a good time for his adored girlfriend to decide he’s irreparably corrupted. And he really wishes he hadn’t accidentally caught the eye of an ornery grandmother who fancies herself his saviour.

There may be a way clear of the chaos in the business proposals of music promoter Colm and in the attention of the charming, impulsive Natalie. But now that his boss’s ambitions have rattled the city, Ryan is about to find out what he’s made of, and it might be that chaos is in his blood.

*The Glorious Heresies is highly recommended if you haven’t read it yet!

Junior Book Club – May

May Junior Book Club recommends…

 

Keeping the CBI Book Awards theme, for May our picks are both nominated for the award, and are being read on the CBI shadowing scheme

The Minsitry of Strange, Unusual, and Impossible Things by Paul Gamble

A novel full of adventure, hilarity, heroism and …pirates, The Ministry of SUITs tells the story of a secret Ministry hidden away in the far reaches of the Ulster Museum in Belfast. It deals with all the strange, unusual and impossible things in the world, the things we don’t want to have to think about or deal with as perfectly-normal-thank-you-very-much people: ancient monsters, wild animals, pirates, aliens and much more. Some people are born to work in the Ministry, and 12-year-old Jack is one of those people. Endlessly curious, perhaps to a level that might be called nosy, Jack finds himself and his frenemy Trudy as the Ministry’s newest recruits. And their first mission? To find out where all the school oddbods are disappearing to…

 

The Call by Peadar O’ Guilin

Cut off from the rest of the world by the carnivorous Sídhe, Irish children over the age of ten wait in fear to be abducted and hunted by these vicious faery folk. Following the travails of several teenagers, including Nessa (unlikely to survive ‘The Call’ due to being permanently disabled from polio), this intense story does not flinch from exploring the price of survival. Ó’ Guilín has created an engrossing young adult novel with rich world building and a distinctive evocation of dread, suspense and resilience.

‘Paper Coffee Cup’ By Caoimhe Massey ☕📝

Caoimhe Massey, our first OLS author to see her name in print, produced the following piece during the Creative Writing Workshop sessions held in school every Thursday at 12:40.

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This really beautifully written piece was printed along with writing from other young authors in a special supplement with the Irish Times.

‘Paper Coffee Cup’ By Caoimhe Massey

She taps her long nails on her knee, 1, 2, 3, imagining the sound they make on a harder surface. She glances at the clock. 9:05am. He takes a sip of his takeaway coffee and when he puts it down, foam spurts out of the hole in the plastic lid. She pinches her tights, picks up the fabric and lets it snap back against her thigh. He writes something on a sheet of paper, the scratching of the pen deafening in the silent room. She coughs. Then she wishes she hadn’t, because now he knows she’s capable of making noise.

“Do you smoke?” he asks. She contemplates not answering.

“No,” she says. It’s the first truth she’s told since she arrived. He raises his eyebrows but says nothing, takes another sip of his coffee and writes something else on the paper. Beige stains the white lid of the coffee cup and she itches to wipe it away. She doesn’t move. He puts the pen and paper beside the coffee on the table.

“You know why you’re here,” he says. He says it in that false-chatty tone people use to make you agree with them. It’s not a question.

“Yes,” she says. It’s not really an answer, either. One of the paintings on the wall behind his head is out of line with the others and she can’t not look at it.

“Do you want to talk about it?” he asks. She almost laughs. She obviously doesn’t. She’s only here because Mr M made her come. There’s nothing wrong with her.

“There’s nothing wrong with me,” she says. She has made a mistake or two. Has bad coping mechanisms. So what? He looks pensive. She likes that word. Pen-sive. It sounds soothing, as if there were no bad things to be pensive about. She pinches her tights again, and this time her nail goes right through the nylon.

“Fuck,” she mutters. He doesn’t hear her.

“I’m not saying there is,” he says, in a voice that tells her yes, that’s definitely what he’s saying.

She looks at the stained coffee cup, then to the crooked painting, then to the fake plants on the windowsill. The blinds are open and she can see the green fence surrounding the primary school next door. She’s supposed to be at school right now. Or, not supposed to be, but she wishes she was. She has science first thing on a Wednesday.

“ . . . are you listening to me?” She looks back at him. His lips are pursed, hiding his mouth between his moustache and his beard. The bottom half of his face is just dark grey hair, no skin visible between his nose and neck.

“No,” she says. She wonders what he’d been saying, briefly. Then she remembers she doesn’t care. She pushes at the hole in her tights. It gets bigger. “I’d rather be at school,” He leans forward as if he’s watching some exciting action movie, Mission Impossible maybe.

“Do you like school?” he asks.

“I hate school,” she says, “It makes me want to . . .” she stops herself, remembers what happened last time she’d said that, Cian’s shocked expression and getting called to Mr M’s office later. It wasn’t even true, not really.

“Want to what?” he asks, because of course he can’t just leave it alone. That’s his job.

“Cry,” she says, then, under her breath, “or something.” He doesn’t hear that part. She focuses on the grey mark beside the door where it hits the wall every time it opens. Then she glances at the clock again. 9.25 am. Still 35 minutes to go. He sips his coffee again, the slurping almost in time with the quietly ticking clock. It’s quiet for a while, and when she concentrates she can hear the sounds of cars on the main road, and, distantly, a window smashing.

“Are you religious?” he asks.

“No,” She says. It’s a half-truth. She’s never been a devout Catholic, but she used to attend mass every Friday and even when she doubted her beliefs (often) the rote liturgies and prayers were soothing. “Not really,” she amends.

He doesn’t say anything after that, and she wonders why he even asked the question. The clock on the wall reads 9.45, the hole in her tights is now the size of a bottle cap, and the middle painting is still crooked. It mustn’t have always been crooked, because she can see a tiny sliver of wall where the cream paint is brighter than the rest.

“I like poetry,” she says. She doesn’t really know why she says it. “I can’t explain why. It just makes me feel.”

“And you don’t, usually?” She doesn’t answer that. It’s too close to and too far from the right question and she feels like she might cry.

“What about your parents?” he asks. She pulls a strip of skin from her lip with her teeth. The taste of blood is metallic.

“They’re okay,” she says, “It’s not because of them,”

“What’s not because of them?” She doesn’t answer, doesn’t feel like she has to. She bites her lip harder and a drop of blood falls onto her hand. She wipes it off on her tights. 9:50am. She hears the kettle boil in reception. He drains his coffee cup, the cardboard popping inwards. It’s tossed into the bin behind his armchair and it’s the only thing there.

She says, “Please fix that painting for next time,” her eyes on the centre canvas. He smiles like he has just won the lottery. She hears voices from reception, glances at the clock. 9.55am. There’s a grey arc on the floor by the door to match the mark on the wall.

“Do you want your mother to come in?” he asks.

“No,” she says, quicker than necessary. “That’s fine.” He picks up the pen and paper and starts to write something new.

“I think it would be beneficial,” he says, and she knows he’s right, but . . . it’s hard.

She says, “Maybe next week,” and he grins widely again. She scratches her nails on her circle of bare thigh, “I’m missing science.”

“And is class more important to you than getting better?” She considers her answer carefully, then, just as she’s about to reply, he says, “Time’s up,” and that’s that. Put all your feelings back in their boxes until next week. Time’s up, but neither of them move until they hear the kettle in reception boil, “See you next week.”

“Thank you,” she says, even though she doesn’t feel very thankful. She doesn’t really feel any different from when she walked in. Maybe she’s a little upset about ripping her tights. She stands up, slowly, stiffly, and he opens the door to let her out. Time to go back to the real world.

📖📖📖📖📖📖📖📖📖📖📖

 
You can read the story on The Irish Times website here

Check out the library on Twitter @DumblebearSays

CBI Book of the Year Awards Shadowing Scheme 2017 📖🤓❤

Our Book Club are delighted to be part of the CBI Book Awards Shadowing Scheme this year!  Established in 2005, the CBI Shadowing Scheme is a unique programme for schools and libraries, designed to encourage awareness and enjoyment of the CBI Book of the Year Awards. 😊

How it works

Each of our Book Club members will read at least two of the choices (which are age appropriate!) by the 10th of May. Up until then we will discuss how our reading is going, and pair up with readers on the same book to discuss them more in depth and to avoid spoilers for others! On the 10th of May, we will each give the books we have read a number of marks out of 100. We will then average the marks for each book and fill out our special CBI Book Awards Ballot Sheet and send it back! It will be very exciting to see if any of our favourites end up getting the Children’s Choice Award! 🤓

Another extremely exciting aspect of being a part of the Shadowing Scheme is that by returning our votes by the 12th of May, we will be in with a chance of attending the CBI Book of the Year Awards ceremony in Dublin’s Smock Alley Theatre on 23rd May as part of International Literature Festival Dublin!! Book nerds unite! 😂✌🤓📖

CBI will announce the Children’s Choice Award during the official prize ceremony in May. The shadowing groups alone choose the Children’s Choice winner so every vote counts! Look out for CBI’s Q&A with shortlisted authors and illustrators on Instagram (@kidsbooksirel) and check out their YouTube channel (CBI-Childrens’ Books Ireland) for lots more.

You can read more about the CBI Awards here

Anybody who is not currently in Book Club, but who would like to be part of the Shadowing Scheme can come and join us on Wednesdays for the 2nd half of lunch! We have books and biscuits! 📖🍪

Here is this years shortlist from which we have chosen four titles to read

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The four titles chosen by Book Club are:

The Call

The Call

by Peadar O’ Guilín

This YA novel is my mashup of the darker parts of Irish mythology and classic survival stories.

‘Your people drove them out of their homes. Thousands of years later they turn up again – and they’re gonna wipe you out.’

THREE MINUTES…

On her birthday, Nessa finds out the terrible truth about her home in Ireland – the truth that will change her future forever.

TWO MINUTES…

That she and her friends must train for the most dangerous three minutes of their lives:

THE CALL.

ONE MINUTE…

That any day now, without warning, they will each wake in a terrifying land, alone and hunted, with a one in ten chance of returning alive.

And it is Nessa, more than anyone, who is going to need every ounce of the guts, wit, and sheer spirit she was born with, if she – and the nation – are to survive.

Suitable for 14+

Published by : David Fickling Books

 

 

plain jane

Plain Jane

by Kim Hood

Jane has lived in the shadow of her sister Emma’s illness for over three years; her life is a never ending monotony of skipping school and long bus rides to the hospital, and her love life is not exactly setting the world on fire.

She feels like she’s stuck in neutral, until she meets Farley, who sees the world –  and Jane – differently. He may just be the person she can count on when things get tough. A heart-breaking novel about dark times, family and – just maybe – love.

Suitable for 12+

Published by : The O’ Brien Press

 

 

The Ministry of Strange, Unusual, and Impossible the ministryThings by Paul Gamble

The Ministry of SUITs is a novel full of adventure, hilarity, heroism and …pirates, The Ministry of SUITs tells the story of a secret Ministry hidden away in the far reaches of the Ulster Museum in Belfast. It deals with all the strange, unusual and impossible things in the world, the things we don’t want to have to think about or deal with as perfectly-normal-thank-you-very-much people: ancient monsters, wild animals, pirates, aliens and much more. Some people are born to work in the Ministry, and 12-year-old Jack is one of those people. Endlessly curious, perhaps to a level that might be called nosy, Jack finds himself and his frenemy Trudy as the Ministry’s newest recruits. And their first mission? To find out where all the school oddbods are disappearing to…

Suitable for 10+

Published by: Little Island Books

Needleworkneedlework

by Deirdre O’ Sullivan

‘I would like to make things beautiful, but a tawdry and repulsive kind of beauty. A braver sort than people have from birth. Sexy zombies on a bicep. That sort of thing.’ Ces longs to be a tattoo artist and embroider skin with beautiful images. But for now she’s just trying to reach adulthood without falling apart. Powerful, poetic and disturbing, Needlework is a girl’s meditation on her efforts to maintain her bodily and spiritual integrity in the face of abuse, violation and neglect.

Suitable for 15+

Published by: Little Island Books
Check out the library on Twitter  @DumblebearSays