CBI Shadowing Video 😍📚✌🏻

Last week I attended the Children’s Books Ireland Awards ceremony where the Shadowing video featuring our Book Club was shown for the first time! I was so proud to see them up on the big screen and all of the authors were raving about how great they were afterwards! You can see the video below.
Marie Bishop B5 and I were judges for this years awards and it was such a wonderful experience to be there yesterday as the winners were announced.

Well done to all the featured students!

Marie Bishop, Sarah Hyland, Catherine Galvin, Rachel O’Connell, Roisin O’ Neill, Roisin Evoy, Aimee Moran, Karen Waters, Roisin Doheny, Rebecca Harper, Caitlin Evoy, and Sarah Moore.

The winners of the CBI Book of the Year Award were Deirdre Sullivan and Karen Vaughan for Tangleweed and Brine. During the ceremony students from King’s Hospital presented Laureate na nÓg Sarah Crossan with the Children’s Choice Award for Moonrise. The Judges’ Special Award: Eoin Colfer for Illegal. The Eilís Dillon Award for a first children’s book: Meg Grehan for The Space Between. Honour Award for Fiction: Sheena Wilkinson for Star by Star. Honour Award for Illustration: Kevin Waldron for Chocolate Cake.

See link below for more info on the winners

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/children-s-books-ireland-book-of-the-year-revealed-1.3504396

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The Baileys Women’s Prize longlist! ✌👭📖❤🤓

Without fail every year at least one new favourite book of mine comes from reading books from the longlist of the Women’s Prize for fiction.

This year’s longlist is looking just as promising, you can see the whole list here: 

Women’s Prize for Fiction Longlist 2018

The Idiot by Elif Batuman
Three Things About Elsie by Joanna Cannon
Miss Burma by Charmaine Craig
Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan
The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar
Sight by Jessie Greengrass
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
When I Hit You: Or, A Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife by Meena Kandasamy
Elmet by Fiona Mozley
The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy
See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt
A Boy in Winter by Rachel Seiffert
Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie
The Trick to Time by Kit de Waal
Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

So far I have only read one on the list, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman and  I would highly recommend it to seniors! Two more sound particularly interesting to me, The Idiot by Elif Batuman, and H(a)ppy  by Nicola Barker (this one because it sounds dystopian and I have a soft spot for dystopian fiction!)

ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE

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 Eleanor Oliphant leads a simple life. She wears the same clothes to work every day, eats the same meal deal for lunch every day and buys the same two bottles of vodka to drink every weekend. Eleanor Oliphant is happy. Nothing is missing from her carefully timetabled life. Except, sometimes, everything. One simple act of kindness is about to shatter the walls Eleanor has built around herself. Now she must learn to navigate the world that everyone else seems to take for granted – while searching for the courage to face the dark corners she’s avoided all her life. Change can be good. Change can be bad. But surely anything is better than…fine?

THE IDIOT

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Selin, a tall, highly strung Turkish-American from New Jersey turns up at Harvard and finds herself dangerously overwhelmed by the challenges and possibilities of adulthood. She studies linguistics and literature, teaches ESL and spends a lot of time thinking about what language – and languages – can do.

Along the way, she befriends Svetlana, a cosmopolitan Serb, and obsesses over Ivan, a mathematician from Hungary. The two conduct a hilarious relationship that culminates with Selin spending the summer teaching English in a Hungarian village and enduring a series of surprising excursions. Throughout her journeys, Selin ponders profound questions about how culture and language shape who we are, how difficult it is to be a writer, and how baffling love is.

H(A)PPY

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Imagine a perfect world where everything is known, where everything is open, where there can be no doubt, no hatred, no poverty, no greed. Imagine a System which both nurtures and protects. A Community which nourishes and sustains. An infinite world. A world without sickness, without death. A world without God. A world without fear.

 

 

 

 

Last year there was Hagseed by Margaret Atwood and The Power by Naomi Alderman which went on to win it!

 

In 2016 we The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers, A Little Life by Hanya Yanigahara, and The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerny which was the winner that year.

 

And in 2015 Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel and The Bees by Laline Paull.

 

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and Twitter @ourladyslibrary

CBI Book of the Year Awards 2018 Shortlist 📚📚📚

The Children’s Books Ireland Book of the Year Shortlist was announced last week, and our Book Club members will be joining in on their Shadowing Scheme again this year! 🤗 (some members pictured)

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The shortlist was compiled by a group of judges, two of whom were Marie Bishop B5 as the young judge, and Ms. Lundon the librarian. The shortlist represents the best in Irish Children’s Literature each year. All titles can be seen on the poster below and are available for loan.

The Shadowing Scheme allows reading groups all over Ireland to read and vote on their favourite titles. The winner of this receives the coveted Children’s Choice Award. Last year’s winner was our favourite The Call by Peadar O’Guilin! We can’t wait to see what the reader favourite will be this year! The award ceremony will be held in May so all will be revealed then. 🤔📚❤

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Take a look at OLS Library on Instagram at olslibrary

and Twitter @ourladyslibrary

 

Shortlisted Titles:

A Dangerous Crossing by Jane Mitchell

A Sailor Went to Sea, Sea, Sea written by Sarah Webb and illustrated by Steve McCarthy

Chocolate Cake written by Michael Rosen and illustrated by Kevin Waldron

Here We Are by Oliver Jeffers

Illegal written by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin and illustrated by Giovanni Rigano

Moonrise by Sarah Crossan

Rabbit and Bear: The Pest in the Nest written by Julian Gough and illustrated by Jim Field

Star by Star by Sheena Wilkinson

Tangleweed and Brine written by Deirdre Sullivan and illustrated by Karen Vaughan

The Space Between by Meg Grehan

The Great Reads Award Shortlist! 📚📚📚

We are delighted to announce the Great Reads Award shortlist for 2017! There is great diversity among the titles this year with something to suit all tastes. See below for more information. All of the books are available in the library, and extra copies of each arrived today. 📚📚📚Voting will be open soon. Meanwhile enjoy reading and have your say! ✌😍📚🤓

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Read as many of these books as you like – preferably all five in your category! Let us know what you think at #GRAIrl on FB, Twitter, or Instagram. Rate your book on www.greatreadsaward.com/rateyourbook by Friday 12th January 2018. We will count the scores from all around Ireland and the winning titles in each category will be announced in February 2018. Students in any second level school are welcome to take part. There will also be a prize for the school that submits the ratings. Have your say!

#GRAIrl

SO many books 😱🤤

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The Great Reads Award 2017 📚📚📚📚📚

This is the second year of The Great Reads Award, a debut YA award shortlisted by SLARI (School Library Association of Ireland) and voted on by teen readers! This summer I’m delighted to one of those school librarians who gets to read wonderful YA books with other librarians to decide on which books will make the shortlist! 🤓✌📚❤
The shortlist will be ready in late August, just in time for all of our eager readers teens to get going on their reading once we are back to school! Our Lady’s is going to be very much involved in the awards so we will get as many readers on board as possible! 👐

Here’s the current longlist, which will be whittled down to eight from 20 by the end of August. I foresee some very hard decisions as they all look so interesting! 😍

Follow the awards for updates on Twitter @greatreadsaward

Facebook The Great Reads Award

I have a lovely little pile to read over the next few weeks, and I’m very tempted to add a few more! 🤓😂

As always you can follow the library on Twitter for more updates @ourladyslibrary 🐻

CBI Book of the Year Awards 2017 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

After months of reading the shortlisted books for the CBI Book of the Year Awards, talking about them, voting on them, and partaking in a video about them (!) the awards were held in Smock Alley Theatre on Tuesday 23rd May and we finally got to hear the winners!

First take a look at our fantastic Book Club Beanbag ladies discussing Historopedia, Plain Jane, The Call, The Ministry of SUITs, and Needlework along with other young shadowers in this wonderful video

*8 mins in to see the OLS girls

Aren’t they fantastic?! Thanks to Sarah Hyland L3, Marie Bishop B4, Jennifer Bishop B1, Catherine Galvin L1, Roisin O’ Neill C1, Anna Murray C1, Isabelle Roantree C1, Halle Donnelly Mahon B1, and Aisling Coyle C1 for participating!

Now for the awards…

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  • Honour Award for Fiction: needleworkDeirdre Sullivan for Needlework. The judges said, ‘Needlework by Deirdre Sullivan is a poetic and eloquent exploration of violation, abuse, neglect and advocacy of the transformative power of art. Starkly genuine and sincere, Sullivan’s powerful use of the metaphor of tattooing invites reflection about identity, difference, self-protection and self-invention. This searing yet delicate representation of adolescent experience will resonate deeply with teenagers and is a story that needs to be told and needs to be read.’ Little Island Books. Suitable for 15+

 

 

  • Judges’ Special Award: Tadhg Mac Dhonnagaín, Jennifer Farley, Brian Fitzpatrick, Tarsila Krüse and Christina O’Donovan for Bliain na nAmhrán. Futa Fata. Suitable for 3-7 year olds.

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  • Eilís Dillon award for a first children’s book: Paul Gamble for The Ministry of Strange, Unusual and Impossible Things. Little Island Books, Suitable for 9+the ministry

 

 

 

Children’s Choice Award:The Call  Peadar Ó Guilín for        The Call. This is the award that was chosen by the shadowing groups who read and judged the ten shortlisted titles and voted for their favourite!

*This was our favourite, and got our vote for Children’s Choice which we think is the most important award, shh…

David Fickling Books. suitable for 14+

 

 

And with such high praise from the man himself who can argue! twitter

 

 

And finally, the overall winner and recipient of the CBI Book of the Year Award 2017 is… 

Picturebook maker Chris Haughton with his book Goodnight Everyone0Chris was also the recipient of the Honour Award for Illustration for the same title. The award judges said ‘Chris Haughton’s vibrant illustrations combine perfectly with deceptively simple narrative in this mesmerising bedtime tale. Chronicling a series of animal yawns, the colour palette gradually darkens as the world of the forest is painted in sunset. Haughton’s use of cut-outs is particularly effective and the star maps in the endpapers add a mystic dimension to this captivating story.’

 

I don’t know about you but now I’m just excited to find out what books will be on the shortlist next year!

 

You can read the Children’s Books Ireland Press Release for more information on the awards.

Take a look at OLS Library on Twitter @ourladyslibrary

Library News Roundup! 🤠

D.E.A.R. – Drop Everything And Readscreenshot_20170427-133859.png  On Friday Our Lady’s School was involved in the nationwide D.E.A.R.!  It was so much fun to be able to stop working and get our books out. A huge thank you to all of the participating teachers!  👍 We definitely want more of this kind of thing!

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  • Book Clubs – Our Junior Book Club meets every Wednesday at lunchtime in the library.  Starting from this month we also have an online version of our Book Club in both Junior and Senior formats.   The idea behind this is to allow anyone to read the Animated-gif-cat-reading-a-bookBook Club monthly picks in their own time, and then discuss them here in the comments!   The Senior version allows for both senior students, as well as teachers and parents, and anyone else who would like to join in on the reading fun!   In September, we hope to have a Senior Book Club monthly meeting in the library!   You can see the current monthly picks by clicking on the book clubs below 🙂   There is now a ‘Book Clubs’ tab on the websites main menu 🤓✌📖

 

 

  • Reading Reps MeetingAs well as consolidating all of the Parent Reading Habits survey information (see below), our Reading Reps decided on a new theme for the month.   So moving on from Mystery Month, we are now into Fantasy Month!  🦄🦄🦄🦄 Look out for fantasy posters around the school, and come check out a fantasy book from the library!  Take a look at the fantasy options on the library’s online catalogue heretumblr_static_tumblr_static_filename_640.gif
    •  Parent Reading Habits Survey results
      It turns out that parents of OLS students love to read :)~58% of those surveyed read on a daily basis. The other 42% varied between, every few days, once a week or less often.
      ~61% prefer to read in the evening, while 29% like to read at any opportunity!
      ~55% spend around 30 minutes reading at a time, while 30% read for an hour or more, and the rest 20 minutes or less.
      ~Fiction, biographies, and specifically crime fiction and mysteries are the most popular types of books with OLS parents!
      ~And finally, from the MANY listed favourite books, the most common ones were ‘The Book Thief’ by Markus Zuzak, ‘The Kite Runner’ by Khaled Hosseini, ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen, and ‘The Girl on the Train’ by Paula Hawkins.Well done to the parents for even deciding on favourites, we know how hard it is! Thank you so much for taking part in the survey, and a very well done to the Reading Reps for carrying out the survey and for tallying the results! 🤓📖✌

 

  • CBI Shadowing Scheme – BOTYA-2017-A3-PosterDelighted to report that the shadowing of the CBI Book Awards books is going brilliantly!  Everyone seems to be particularly enjoying ‘The Call’ by Peadar O’ Guilin.   As well as that we have some secret and exciting news regarding the Shadowing Scheme that we will soon be able to share with everyone! 😎

 

 

 

  • Monthly Book Review Competitiontenor This Friday is the deadline for April’s Book Review Competition (where did April go?!) To enter you just need to review any book and give it a star rating out of five. Then email your review to librarian@olschool.ie to be in with a chance of winning a €10 book token! Get writing! 💸💸💸

Take a look at the library on Twitter @ourladyslibrary

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CBI Book of the Year Awards Shadowing Scheme 2017 📖🤓❤

Our Book Club are delighted to be part of the CBI Book Awards Shadowing Scheme this year!  Established in 2005, the CBI Shadowing Scheme is a unique programme for schools and libraries, designed to encourage awareness and enjoyment of the CBI Book of the Year Awards. 😊

How it works

Each of our Book Club members will read at least two of the choices (which are age appropriate!) by the 10th of May. Up until then we will discuss how our reading is going, and pair up with readers on the same book to discuss them more in depth and to avoid spoilers for others! On the 10th of May, we will each give the books we have read a number of marks out of 100. We will then average the marks for each book and fill out our special CBI Book Awards Ballot Sheet and send it back! It will be very exciting to see if any of our favourites end up getting the Children’s Choice Award! 🤓

Another extremely exciting aspect of being a part of the Shadowing Scheme is that by returning our votes by the 12th of May, we will be in with a chance of attending the CBI Book of the Year Awards ceremony in Dublin’s Smock Alley Theatre on 23rd May as part of International Literature Festival Dublin!! Book nerds unite! 😂✌🤓📖

CBI will announce the Children’s Choice Award during the official prize ceremony in May. The shadowing groups alone choose the Children’s Choice winner so every vote counts! Look out for CBI’s Q&A with shortlisted authors and illustrators on Instagram (@kidsbooksirel) and check out their YouTube channel (CBI-Childrens’ Books Ireland) for lots more.

You can read more about the CBI Awards here

Anybody who is not currently in Book Club, but who would like to be part of the Shadowing Scheme can come and join us on Wednesdays for the 2nd half of lunch! We have books and biscuits! 📖🍪

Here is this years shortlist from which we have chosen four titles to read

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The four titles chosen by Book Club are:

The Call

The Call

by Peadar O’ Guilín

This YA novel is my mashup of the darker parts of Irish mythology and classic survival stories.

‘Your people drove them out of their homes. Thousands of years later they turn up again – and they’re gonna wipe you out.’

THREE MINUTES…

On her birthday, Nessa finds out the terrible truth about her home in Ireland – the truth that will change her future forever.

TWO MINUTES…

That she and her friends must train for the most dangerous three minutes of their lives:

THE CALL.

ONE MINUTE…

That any day now, without warning, they will each wake in a terrifying land, alone and hunted, with a one in ten chance of returning alive.

And it is Nessa, more than anyone, who is going to need every ounce of the guts, wit, and sheer spirit she was born with, if she – and the nation – are to survive.

Suitable for 14+

Published by : David Fickling Books

 

 

plain jane

Plain Jane

by Kim Hood

Jane has lived in the shadow of her sister Emma’s illness for over three years; her life is a never ending monotony of skipping school and long bus rides to the hospital, and her love life is not exactly setting the world on fire.

She feels like she’s stuck in neutral, until she meets Farley, who sees the world –  and Jane – differently. He may just be the person she can count on when things get tough. A heart-breaking novel about dark times, family and – just maybe – love.

Suitable for 12+

Published by : The O’ Brien Press

 

 

The Ministry of Strange, Unusual, and Impossible the ministryThings by Paul Gamble

The Ministry of SUITs is a novel full of adventure, hilarity, heroism and …pirates, The Ministry of SUITs tells the story of a secret Ministry hidden away in the far reaches of the Ulster Museum in Belfast. It deals with all the strange, unusual and impossible things in the world, the things we don’t want to have to think about or deal with as perfectly-normal-thank-you-very-much people: ancient monsters, wild animals, pirates, aliens and much more. Some people are born to work in the Ministry, and 12-year-old Jack is one of those people. Endlessly curious, perhaps to a level that might be called nosy, Jack finds himself and his frenemy Trudy as the Ministry’s newest recruits. And their first mission? To find out where all the school oddbods are disappearing to…

Suitable for 10+

Published by: Little Island Books

Needleworkneedlework

by Deirdre O’ Sullivan

‘I would like to make things beautiful, but a tawdry and repulsive kind of beauty. A braver sort than people have from birth. Sexy zombies on a bicep. That sort of thing.’ Ces longs to be a tattoo artist and embroider skin with beautiful images. But for now she’s just trying to reach adulthood without falling apart. Powerful, poetic and disturbing, Needlework is a girl’s meditation on her efforts to maintain her bodily and spiritual integrity in the face of abuse, violation and neglect.

Suitable for 15+

Published by: Little Island Books
Check out the library on Twitter  @DumblebearSays

 

 

 

 

The Baileys Women’s Prize longlist! ✌👭📖❤🤓

In keeping with the celebration of International Women’s Day, the longlist for this year’s Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, which features writers from six countries, including Ireland, was announced today.

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Irish writer Eimear McBride, who won in 2014, is represented again by her second novel The Lesser Bohemians.  Very exciting! Each year the Baileys Women’s Prize produces at least one future favourite book! Last years longlist contained library favourites such as The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, Ruby, A Little Life, and two Irish authored favourites, The Glorious Heresies and The Green Road. Pretty Impressive. The previous year contained the fantastic Station Eleven, and  The Bees. Regarding this years longlist, I am already in the middle of Margaret Atwood’s Hagseed, and I think The Power by Naomi Alderman, Barkskins by Annie Proulx, and Stay with Me by Ayóbámi Adébáyó will have to be read immediately after!

Here is the longlist ….

A woman sets off for her father-in-law’s funeral 15 years after she last saw her husband. ‘Nobody here knows I’m still married to you. I only tell a slice of the story; I was barren and my husband took another wife.’ The even-tempered prose of this cleverly plotted Nigerian debut reveals a life story worthy of Greek tragedy, involving disease, adultery, manslaughter and the loss of children in a country where the dynastic imperative can destroy the most decent of people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the titles in Hogarth’s Shakespeare project, Hag-Seed is Atwood’s retelling of The Tempest. A theatre director seeks professional revenge on a colleague by staging a production of – you guessed it – The Tempest. Viv Groskop called it ‘a magical eulogy to Shakespeare, leading the reader through a fantastical reworking of the original but infusing it with ironic nods to contemporary culture, thrilling to anyone who knows The Tempest intimately, but equally compelling to anyone not overly familiar with the work.’

 

 

 

 

The 1965 murder of two children in New York is the subject of Flint’s debut thriller, which uses this historic incident as the peg for an investigation into the vilification of women in mid-20th century America and beyond. In a narrative that alternates between their mother, Ruth – a glamorous figure who numbs her grief with drink and sex – and an ambitious young tabloid journalist, Flint creates a surround-sound chorus of public disapproval, blending true crime and literary fiction.

 

 

 

Having overcome the demons of family dysfunction and addiction, 47-year-old Ginger faces a childless middle age in upstate New York, with the husband she met at AA. He won’t adopt, so they sign up to a scheme to provide holidays for inner-city children. Along comes 11-year-old Velvet, a Dominican from Brooklyn, who brings her own baggage of disadvantage – and becomes obsessed with the horse next door. In alternating voices, Gaitskill’s third novel explores the limits of good intentions in the face of social and racial inequality.

 

 

 

Grant, who won the Orange prize in 2000 with When I Lived in Modern Times, heads back to the 1950s in The Dark Circle. When Lenny and his sister Miriam are diagnosed with tuberculosis, the newly created NHS ships them off to a sanatorium in Kent called the Gwendo. There they find a cross-section of British life and rumours of a miracle cure.Christobel Kent hailed Grant’s pervasive intelligence and the ‘supple instinctiveness’ of her descriptions.

 

 

 

McBride’s second novel – her first, A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing, won the 2014 Baileys – documents the frighteningly intense relationship between an 18-year-old woman and a man 20 years older. In her review, Lara Fiegel said: ‘McBride evokes brilliantly the distinctive pleasure of days spent in bed, moving imperceptibly between humour and passion, and between violent and tender desire.’

 

 

 

Melrose’s debut finds a father and son confronting a hard Suffolk winter and reflecting on a hugely traumatic death while the family was farming in Zambia. Alternate chapters from Vale and Landyn chart the guilt and grief that have driven them apart. Melissa Harrison praised Melrose’s ‘boots-on-the-ground research’ and her handling of the two narrators: ‘Neither of them sounds like a well-educated female novelist “doing” farmers, and getting as entirely out of one’s own skin like that, as a writer, is no mean feat.’

 

 

 

CE Morgan tackles race and horseracing in an ambitious second novel spanning the 250 years since US independence. Chronicling the history of a grand old Kentucky family, as well as that of their slaves and black workers, Morgan unveils a dazzling display of narrative techniques. Writing in the New York Times, Dwight Garner suggested her literary sins ‘derive from her muse, which appears to be almost too big to carry … She has constructed an enormous bonfire that never fully lights. What’s interesting about it is her almost blinding promise.’

When two 80-year-old widows – one white, one black – are thrown together after 20 years of sniping over the garden hedge, their hostility starts to thaw as they share memories of Cape Town’s awkward past. According to Publishers Weekly, Omotoso ‘captures the changing racial relations since the 1950s, as well as the immigrant experience through personal detail and small psychological insights into mixed emotions, the artist’s eye, and widow’s remorse’.

 

 

 

At the start of the Great Depression, two foundlings growing up in a Montreal orphanage discover they are kindred spirits. The boy, Pierrot, can play the piano, and the girl, Rose, can dance. Saved by love and talent from an abusive regime, they become itinerant players before separation drives them to lives of crime. Only as the second world war breaks out are they reunited in a magical vaudeville, in which the hardships of life are swept away by a fantasia of clowning, acrobatics and austerity-defying song and dance.

 

 

 

Cora Seagrave is a widow who leaves London for the village of Aldwinter in Essex, where she hears of the Essex Serpent, a folk tale apparently come to life and terrorising the Blackwater estuary.In his review, M John Harrison said: ‘Narrative and voice coil together until it is very difficult to stop reading, very difficult to avoid being dragged into Aldwinter’s dark and sometimes darkly comic waters.’ Perry’s novel won the Waterstones book of the year, and was also nominated for the Costa novel award and the Wellcome prize.

 

 

Proulx takes on climate change and the tragedy of the commons in a 700-page epic that explores how the unthinking exploitation of the Earth’s resources has brought us to the edge of environmental collapse. René Sel and Charles Duquet arrive in 17th-century Canada, where Duquet founds a dynasty that wreaks havoc on the natural world over the course of the next 300 years. According to Alex Clark, Proulx is ‘profoundly committed to the novel’s ecological message … But that can make for didactic reading, even when one agrees with the message.’

 

 

Riley’s cool, unnerving novels, narrated by young women who seek to remove themselves from the world while remaining passionately engaged with the absurdity of existence, have always raised questions about fiction and autobiography. Her sixth book, probing the toxic marriage between a writer in her 30s and an older man, is no exception. The narrator lays bare the shame, cruelty and claustrophobic intimacies binding two difficult and unhappy people in a novel that is both hard to bear and impossible to put down

 

 

 

Two moments of popular resistance stand at the heart of Thien’s ambitious novel of Chinese history. The first takes place during Mao’s Cultural Revolution, when a crackdown on western music was faced down on television by the Debussy expert He Luting. The second is the Tiananmen Square demonstrations of 1989. Around these pivotal moments, Thien constructs a multi-generational epic that investigates how culture survives when families are driven apart and musicians are stripped of their art.

 

 

 

Growing up as an only child in Switzerland during the second world war, Gustav has had to cultivate a stiff upper lip. His policeman father has died in disgrace after helping Jews in the supposedly neutral country. His best friend, Anton, is also Jewish: a highly-strung pianist whose artistic temperament is in marked contrast to Gustav’s frigid decency, and whose talent threatens to take him to a more glamorous life. ‘A perfect novel about life’s imperfection,’wrote Kate Kellaway.
Check out the library on Twitter  @DumblebearSays

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction

We should all be making an effort to read more female authors, so with that in mind here is the nominated longlist, and more recently announced shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction! There are some fantastic sounding books on this. I am particularly looking forward to reading The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet (I have a soft spot for science fiction, particularly when gender issues are tackled!), and The Green Road by Anne Enright which has been on my to-read list for a while.

I can highly recommend two which have made the shortlist. A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara is devastating and beautifully written, and it’s a popular one among Our Lady’s staff at the moment! The other is The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney, which is the first novel of this Irish writer, a thrilling read with lots of raw social commentary.

If you have read any on the list or are intrigued by any of the titles let us know in the comments! 😊 📚 ❤️‍